Pork Bone Broth Tripe Soup

Pork Bone Broth Tripe Soup

Tripe can be good for your body and below is an article that showcases its benefits plus a recipe from Grandma Maria’s brother in Slovakia.

Is Tripe Good for You?
By Sara Ipatenco

Source: thenest.com

If you can stomach the thought of eating the offal from an animal’s stomach, usually a cow’s, you’ll be getting a variety of essential vitamins and minerals. Tripe can be eaten plain, but it’s often added to Mexican soups and stews to enhance the flavor. If you’re willing to give tripe a try, you’ll be eating a main dish that’s also low in fat and calories.

Calories, Fat and Protein
A 3.5-ounce portion of tripe contains 94 calories and 4 grams of fat, of which 1.3 grams are saturated. If you follow the average 2,000-calorie diet, your upper intake of saturated fat should be 22 grams per day, which is about 10 percent of your total caloric intake, according to MayoClinic.com. A serving of tripe provides about 6 percent of that daily limit. It’s wise to limit your intake of saturated fat because it can raise your cholesterol and contribute to heart disease. The same portion of tripe also supplies 11.7 grams of protein, which translates to one-quarter of the 46 grams women need each day.

Minerals
Tripe is an excellent source of zinc, a mineral that’s responsible for helping you heal from injuries and keeping your immune system working properly. A 3.5-ounce serving of tripe delivers 1.71 milligrams of zinc, which is 21 percent of the 8 milligrams women should consume each day. That same serving of tripe also supplies small amounts of iron, calcium and phosphorus.

Vitamins
Most impressively, among vitamins a 3.5-ounce serving of tripe provides 0.72 micrograms of vitamin B-12. That translates to 30 percent of the 2.4 micrograms of vitamin B-12 adults need each day. Vitamin B-12 supports a normal metabolism, aids your body in making red blood cells and promotes a healthy nervous system. A serving of tripe also delivers small doses of niacin and vitamin E.

Tips and Considerations
Because tripe is low in calories and total fat, it can be a healthy addition to your eating plan. In fact, you might replace a serving of red meat with tripe to cut your overall intake of saturated fat. If you’re going to prepare tripe, keep in mind that it takes about 12 hours to fully cook the meat. Look for honeycomb tripe, rather than smooth tripe, because it tends to be the most tender and mild-tasting. Add cooked tripe to tortilla soup or posole to enhance the flavor and the nutrition. For a different flavor, give pickled tripe a try. This version is available in many supermarkets in the aisle with ethnic or Mexican foods.

BONUS RECIPE!

Pork Bone Broth Tripe Soup

In large pot add:

  • 2 Pork hock(not smoked)
  • Pork neck bones Cover everything with water.
  • Add 1/2 cup vinegar. Bring to boil and start taking impurities out.
  • Simmer for 6 or 8 hours.
  • 1 hour before finishing add vegetables – carrots 4, celery 4, Garlic 4 pieces, onion
  • 1 1/2half teaspoon Italian seasoning. Salt, pepper any spices you like. (Powder chilli or turmeric)

Tripe

In a separate pot boil cleaned and cut into small pieces tripes. Cook about 6 hours or till nice and soft. Strained tripes are added to pork bone broth. Enjoy.

Comfort by the Cup

Comfort by the Cup

by Health & Wellness Retailer Magazine, pages 17-18

Soup has long been considered a comfort food. In fact, many people rely on broths, bisques, and bouillabaisses to help them get through a bout of a cold or the chilliest winter months. It warms from the inside out and is the perfect accompaniment to a salad or your favourite sandwich. Alone or as a side dish, with a good book or a slice of homemade bread, soup is a staple in many people’s lives for both comfort and wellness.

Hot liquids, in general, help to keep the body hydrated, soothe a sore throat and can relieve nasal congestion. In fact, chicken soup, in particular, is notoriously associated with cold and flu recovery because chicken contains an amino acid called cysteine, which is released when made into broth. Dr. Christian Brix of BONED Broth says, “Cysteine is an amino acid that helps improve communication in our immune cells, which aids in the body’s healing process.”

According to The Dieticians of Canada, “Many foods in our diet can be filled with sodium, and too much salt can raise your blood pressure, as sodium draws water from the body to the veins, leaving your body vulnerable to dehydration. Dehydration can lead to unclear thinking, mood changes, digestive issues, and other health issues.”

In other words, consuming soup is not only beneficial for a person’s emotional state; it’s good for the body too.

Dieticians of Canada advise, “Not only is soup perfect for staying cozy and healthy, but soup made with bone broth is rich in minerals that support the immune system and feature collagen, which has been shown to help heal the gut lining from damage; in addition, bone broth has been known to help to make your skin glow and reduce joint pain as well as support digestive health.”

BONED Broth has recently undergone a rebranding, coming back to market as the only federally certified organic brand of bone broth in Canada. BONED Broth was born from co-owner grandma Marie’s Slovakian family recipes, brought over from the old country. She and Dr. Christian Brix along with board member, Dr. Jennifer Dyck, naturopathic doctor remain committed to not only producing the freshest, and most nutrient-packed broths, but also to share the education about the benefits of broth. And, with a new kitchen in Vancouver’s lower mainland, supply demands will not be an issue. “Our greatest challenge was getting the best quality bones. But we have found them,” he says, “and we are more prepared than ever to deliver the best possible bone broth.”

He goes on, “One of the most popular movements in the world of nutrition these days is to follow a Keto or Paleo diet. Bone broth is a superstar for anyone wanting to adhere to a Keto/Paleo program.”

Dr. Brix and Dr. Dyck lecture together, spreading the word about the health benefits and medical upside to regularly consuming bone broth.

Read the whole article in this Fall 2018 edition of Health & Wellness Retailer Magazine, pages 17-18

Purple Sweet Potato Bone Broth Soup

Purple Sweet Potato Bone Broth Soup

Who doesn’t love looking at this bowl or soup? We know we do!

By RACHAEL’S GOOD EATS

 Servings 2 servings
 Author Rachael DeVaux

Ingredients

  • 2-3 cups bone broth (I use Bonafide Provision’s)
  • 1 cup filtered water
  • 1 medium purple sweet potato, skinned and diced
  • 1-2 tbsp avocado or olive oil
  • 1 organic chicken breast
  • 3 heaping cups swiss chard, chopped
  • 1 tbsp ghee (I use Fourth & Heart Himalayan Pink Salt)
  • pink salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Chop chicken breast into 1-inch pieces and sauté in a skillet with oil, s + p until fully cooked.

  2. Meanwhile, in a medium pot, sauté diced purple sweet potato in oil, salt and pepper for about 8-10 minutes on medium heat, stirring constantly. Once sweet potato is slightly tender, add in remaining ingredients (broth, water, ghee, Swiss chard, s + p) + cooked chicken and let heat for 5-7 minutes, covered.

  3. Top with red chili flakes and diced avocado. Enjoy!

BONED® Broth Bull Shot

BONED® Broth Bull Shot

This drink is often drunk hot, poured from a Thermos on crisp winter walks but served over cracked ice it is a beast.

Meat and alcohol, in a glass with pepper and chili.

The bull shot has many variations. If you have it heated, it may need a little dry sherry in the mix to give it more body if you like. Some people add orange juice, as well as lemon, to the mix. It is also fantastic with Vodka or Tequilla.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Beef Boned Broth
  • 1 shot Bourbon
  • 1/2 tsp Hot Sauce
  • 1 tbsp Tomato sauce or juice
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire Sauce
  • Dash of Fresh Lemon Juice
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 1 Celery Stalk, for garnish

In a blender, combine all ingredients except the celery and blend until smooth.

Alternatively, serve it hot by heating the mixture in a small saucepan over medium-high heat.

Serve immediately in a glass, garnished with the celery stalk.

 

 

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Paleo Poutine

Paleo Poutine

Oh Canada, do I ever love poutine! Fries. Good! Gravy. Good! Cheese curds. So GOOD! It had me thinking what better way to celebrate #NationalFrenchFryDay and Canada’s 150th with a little paleo palette pleasing poutine.

Where to begin such mouthful? Naturally, the easiest part is using our BONED Beef Broth for the gravy and a close second to that is using sweet potatoes for the fries. The biggest challenge? Cheese curds. Well, if you are in British Columbia and love local products you are going to LOVE my suggestion so much, you may never crave regular poutine again. I say that confidently having wolfed down two platefuls of poutine myself.

Sweet Potato Paleo Poutine, serves 2-4 as a side dish

Sweet Potato Fries
3 medium/large sweet potatoes
1 tablespoon tapioca flour
1 tablespoon of olive oil
salt, pepper to season

BONED Broth Paleo Gravy
2 tablespoons ghee
2-3 tablespoons tapioca flour
1 pint BONED, A Broth Company Ltd. Beef Broth
1 teaspoon dried Thyme
salt, pepper to season

“Cheese Curds”
Spread’em Cucumber and Garlic Fermented Cashew Cream-Cheese-Style Spread

 

First, peel the potatoes. Then cut them into matchsticks keeping them relatively the same thickness. This will help them cook evenly. (length doesn’t matter)

Soak the cut potatoes in water for 15-20 minutes.

Drain and pat dry. Add fries, tapioca flour, salt and pepper to a mixing bowl and mix well. Cover two baking sheets with aluminum foil and spread out fries evenly. They will turn out crispier if they aren’t crowded on the baking sheet.

Bake at 450°F for 12 minutes, flip fries and bake another 12 minutes. Turn the oven off, open the door just a little and allow the fries to sit in there for another 5-6 minutes.

Melt the ghee in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add one tablespoon of the tapioca flour to start. Whisk to combine.

Add a pint of BONED. I added mine still partially frozen. Add Thyme and heat to till melted and a slight boil. Turn down to low and simmer. Continue to stir. If not reaching preferred thickness add another tablespoon of tapioca flour. Don’t add too much too quickly or it can come out a little gelatinous. Stir until thickened. Season to taste.

Plate fries, scoop dollops of Spread-em onto fries and drizzle with gravy. ENJOY!

To be honest, I take a lot of pleasure in mixing things up. Beef broth with a vegan, cashew cream cheese isn’t just ridiculously delicious, paleo and Whole30 friendly. It’s pure foodie fun! I will be extremely surprised if I even make it to making the gravy next time. Sweet potato fries and the Spread’em Cucumber & Garlic fermented cashew cream-cheese-style spread easily bring #NationalFrenchFryDay to a new level. Or for the vegans out there that are craving a plate of poutine, we offer the UNBONED Vegan Broth that could easily slip in a replace the BONED Beef Broth to create the ultimate plant-powered protein vegan poutine. Another mouthful that has me drooling!


Credits // Author and Photography: Suzanne Serwatuk